Tuesday, 30 July 2019

Incredible Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread - an easy to bake recipe full of wholegrain goodness (optional dairy free)


Do you dream of perfect wholemeal bread that is also gluten free? I know I did! It is one of those elusive 'desperately want' staples that evades the gluten free and coeliac experience and leaves you longing and hoping that it will one day be achievable. Well, my lovely readers, that day has come.... Meet my best ever Gluten Free Brown Bread.... It may turn out to be the only recipe you will ever need.

Anyone who follows the Gluten Free Alchemist Instagram feed or my Face Book Page will know that I have been teasing you with this loaf for months. I make no apology for the delay in bringing it to you. I had to be really and truly happy with it before I was willing to 'go public'... and yes... I AM a perfectionist and proud.


Don't think you're a baker? My Gluten Free Brown Bread recipe is easy to make and is good for you too...

Seriously, I hope this loaf will change the way you feel about gluten free bread... Real gluten free home-baked bread CAN be done.... and this is the loaf that proves it. It is simple and straightforward (once you have made it a couple of times, you get into a quick rhythm of pre-prepping the dry mix, which makes the rest child's play) and promises not only incredible texture, but also a great nutrition boost as well.


Easy to make, this gluten free brown bread is not only wholemeal, but contains no preservatives and no gums.... It is full of goodness from the gluten free oats, flax, psyllium and other wholegrain, protein-rich flours contained within and is enriched with eggs and milk (dairy free optional) for extra nutritionally-needed protein and vitamin D.

The eggs also help provide structure. Whilst I'm sure there must be a way to replicate without egg, I do not yet know what that is...

This bread doesn't crumble, is not dry, remains soft and lastingly fresh for days, toasts well, makes great sandwiches and tastes incredible... with (or without) any topping or filling. I do not make any of these claims lightly. This is not gluten free wholemeal bread that has been slung together hopefully.... It has been my work for many months... testing, honing, tweaking, re-testing over and over again until I can say hand on heart, I can tweak no more. This may be the best I can do (although those who know me will vouch that finding the key to making perfect gluten free bread (brown or otherwise) is an obsession of mine, that will no doubt continue into the future with ever-more variations and options).


I have always made my brown bread using 1 pound loaf tins, mainly because that's a good size for our needs. I would recommend you do the same, because I know this works (and I have no idea why, but I have never actually tried making it as a two-pound loaf). I usually use a metal tin the shape of the one photographed above, although it works just as well in a non-holed tin. I can also vouch for the eat one now, freeze one for later approach... The loaf freezes well, although may lose a tiny bit of 'elasticity' once defrosted. Just make sure it is well wrapped in a sealed bag before freezing (I have just one bag that I keep using for each batch to save on plastic waste).

The recipes below include a corn and buckwheat free version as I know these ingredients can cause issues for some people. The next stage development for my gluten free wholemeal bread is to try and vary to a non-oat version for the oat-intolerant among you, but I am also testing for a bread-maker version too. If there are any other flours on the list that you cannot eat or tolerate, please please leave me a comment or send an e-mail and I will offer alternatives and substitutes.


What do other people think of my Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread?

The final recipe that I share with you here, has been mixed, proved, baked and eaten every week at GFHQ for months. It consistently rises, has a consistent texture and consistently brings a smile to all our faces. Even Mr GF who is a gluten-eater when away from home (god-forbid, I would never let gluten cross the threshold here...) thinks it is amazingly good and compares with the expectations of wholemeal wheat bread (it certainly comes darn close to my recollections, both for texture and flavour).


Actually... He goes further in telling me that it is better than wheat bread. Now... I could tell myself that he is just being nice because I am married to him, but believe me when I tell you that Mr GF and indeed Miss GF are my harshest critics... These guys really don't beat around the bush when they don't like something I have made, or when they think it isn't up to standard... THIS bread surpasses the grade with both of them.

Praise for my recipe doesn't stop at home though. I have shared my wholemeal bread with friends, family and with several others when I attended a Life Reboot Camp weekend. I also gave a version of the loaf made with Fairy Flour to the Free From Fairy herself (who shared it with her sister), when I attended the Free From & Allergy Show in London. I have been both humbled and proud of the positive comments it has received.


What is the best way to get ingredients ready to make my Gluten Free Brown Bread?

You may be looking down the list of flours and thinking 'blimy... that's a lot of ingredients'.... and yes, you are most definitely right. Sometimes, when you are aiming for gluten free wholemeal bread perfection, you have to push the boat out and throw the entire contents of the larder at it until you find just the right combination. But actually, most of the base flours are in proportion with my tried and tested home-blended rice-free flour blend, so if you keep the blend pre-mixed and ready, adding the additional or alternative flours is no trouble at all. Alternatively, you can use pre-blended Fairy Flour (version 4 of the recipe has been tried with this blend), if you want to simplify things (you can get six 1-pound loaves with one bag of her flour plus the other ingredients used in the recipe).


If you are not sure where to find the flours needed, it's worth checking with your local health food shop (independents are particularly willing to order in for you, if they don't have them already), but I also often buy on-line from Healthy Supplies or Shipton Mill and some of you may still be eligible to get some individual pure flours on prescription. Sadly, we no longer can... If you are outside the UK, you probably know your flour sources better than I would, but if you are not sure, go on line and just double check the GF status of any flour you buy.

Because I use oat flour so often (making wholemeal bread at least once a week), I make sure I have a stash ready and waiting in an airtight container in the larder (I have always ground my own in the blender using gluten free oats.... it's cheaper and more accessible). I also have a small airtight container of psyllium husk powder (available from many health food stores) which I grind at home too.

In fact, what I usually do (because I make this loaf every week), is keep a separate airtight container handy and then when I get a spare moment, I mix up all the dry ingredients for the bread recipe and set aside, prepped for my Friday night/Saturday morning bake session. This means that making gluten free wholemeal bread dough literally takes me 20 minutes and then I twiddle my thumbs or chill with a mug of coffee and a book for less than an hour more, whilst it proves and bakes... Job done! I may have it down to a fine art, but really, it is so easy once you have made it a couple of times.


I have tested the recipe for my gluten free brown bread with dozens of flour combinations to get to the recipes that I share with you here. Heads up though... occasionally when the bread cools after baking, it sucks in slightly at the sides. The 'sucking-in' is randomly intermittent and I have no idea why it happens. Either way, it does not affect the final texture of the bread, but the shape of each slice may not be a perfect 'square'.

So without any more waffle... here it is. The recipe that I have wanted to share with you for so long... my Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread. If you have any questions, please contact me either by e-mail or in the comments below and I will do my best to make amazing gluten free brown bread as easy and accessible for you as possible...

And please.... if you do make it, let me know how you got on. I would LOVE to hear from you!


Note added after publishing : If you don't have any milk powder, you can use a straight sub of water quantity for milk, but it is important that you heat it to the right temperature, before adding to the mixture. The use of milk powder is because it is generally easier to get water to the correct temperature and to boil a kettle than to heat milk in a microwave or saucepan to the correct temperature (with less washing up). You can also take the dry mix self-catering, ready to whip up some bread whilst on holiday.

A number of people have now made this bread using one 2 lb tin. I understand that it has mostly worked well, although cooking time will need adjustment. Those who have used a larger tin have adjusted oven temperature and timings as follows : 20 mins at 200 C/Gas 6,  then turn oven down to 180 C/Gas 4 for a further 40 minutes. If concerned that the loaf is browning to quickly, pop a piece of foil over the top towards the end. 

Vicki (Free From Fairy) has also made an alternative version using milk kefir. She uses a straight sub of home-made kefir for the same volume of water (removing any additional milk powder from the recipe).

If you make any alternative versions, please let me know! 


gluten free; bread; recipe; home-baked; wholegrain; wholemeal; dairy free
Bread; Baking; Recipes; Gluten Free; Dairy Free
Bread
Yield: Two 1 pound loaves
Author:

Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread

A perfect gluten free wholemeal brown loaf made with oat and other wholegrain flours. This easy-to-make loaf stays fresh for days, makes amazing sandwiches, toasts beautifully and tastes delicious. Freezes well.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 25 Mtotal time: 75 M

ingredients:

Version 1 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (original)
  • 250g Gluten Free Alchemist Rice Free Blend from this post (equivalent to 50g sorghum flour; 25g white teff flour; 25g buckwheat flour; 80g tapioca starch flour; 30g potato starch flour; 40g corn flour (starch))
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 2 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (slightly more earthy & dark)
  • 160g GFA Rice Free Blend from this post
  • 90g additional teff flour (white or brown)
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 3 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (No Corn; No Buckwheat)
  • 80g sorghum flour
  • 80g white (or brown) teff flour
  • 60g tapioca starch flour
  • 30g potato starch flour
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 4 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (with Free From Fairy Plain Wholegrain Flour)
  • 250g Free From Fairy plain GF wholegrain flour
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins

instructions:

How to cook Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread

  1. Mix together the dry ingredients (flours, oat, flax, psyllium husk, salt, bicarbonate of soda, milk powder and yeast) in an airtight container and shake vigorously to blend.
  2. Very lightly grease the inside of two one pound non-stick bread tins using either a little butter or oil, base line the tin with a piece of baking paper (cut to size) and then gently coat the sides of the tin with a light dusting of brown rice flour/buckwheat flour/sorghum flour (put a teaspoon of flour in the tin and gently turn from side to side until coated. Tip out any excess).
  3. In a large bowl, lightly beat together the eggs, oil, honey and lemon juice to combine.
  4. Add the warm water and briefly whisk through to mix with the other wet ingredients. It will foam slightly, but this is fine.
  5. Whilst the liquid is still warm, add the dry ingredients and using either a dough hook or beating with a silicone/wooden spoon/spatula, mix until well blended.
  6. Place the bowl to one side and leave to sit for 3 to 5 minutes to enable the flours to absorb the liquid, before beating again. You should now have a dough 'batter' that resembles very thick porridge.
  7. Split the batter between the two tins evenly and using the back of a spoon (dipped in cold water), smooth the tops.
  8. Place the tins in a warm place to rise for about 25 minutes - I place the tins on a folded tea towel in the oven at 80C for a perfect prove (the bread should rise approx 2 to 3 cm (max) above the tin with a gently rounded top).
  9. Pre-heat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4. When the dough has risen, bake for about 25 minutes until nicely browned and firm. 
  10. Remove from the oven and take out of the tins (you may need to gently release the sides using a spatula or flat knife) and leave to cool on a wire rack. 
  11. As with all bread, this loaf is easiest to cut when left to cool completely, although (unlike most gluten free bread) it tastes totally delicious when still warm.
  12. Wrap in clingfilm or put in a sealable bag to store and keep fresh. Store at room temperature if possible. 

NOTES:

Preparation time : 25 minutes for mixture (including weighing and standing time) 25 minutes to prove 25 minutes to bake If you cannot eat dairy, substitute the milk powder with a dairy-free alternative (depending on the milk-base, the flavour may be affected slightly, although I have used coconut milk powder and it has not been noticeable). I have tested this recipe on a huge variety of flour combinations. You may find on occasion, that as the loaf cools, it sucks in slightly at the sides. I have no idea why this happens and it does not seem to be relevant to the blend or tin used. It will not affect the flavour, texture or crumb of the final loaf.
Created using The Recipes Generator

I am sharing this incredible Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread Recipe with :

 

Cook Blog Share with Easy Peasy Foodie
Full Plate Thursday #443 with Miz Helen's Country Cottage
Fiesta Friday #287 with Angie, The Not So Creative Cook and Parsi Cuisine


Baking Crumbs with Apply to Face Blog and Jo's Kitchen Larder
The Bloggers Pit Stop

What's for Dinner with The Lazy Gastronome

Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-19 unless otherwise indicated



28 comments:

  1. GF Oats are not acceptable in Australia- can you help with possibility of replacing with another ingredient please

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will do Carol. I’m working out the best options x

      Delete
  2. wow those photos are really amazing. I had to read the recipe a couple of times to check there is no kneading - which I guess is because you have no gluten to develop. I guess you are not in a gluten space but for people like me who make wheat bread, having it no-knead is a great thing and a good reason to try a gluten free bread! As a wheat bread baker, I disagree that gluten bread does not taste good warm - it is delicious warm - one of our treats is bread warm from the oven - but I have a rule of cooling it an hour before cutting because it is still baking after it comes out of the oven (not sure if this is the same). And I am not sure if I missed it but could not see where it says how many days it lasts before 1) only good for toast and 2) needs freezer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Joanna. Rarely is gluten free bread really good straight out of the oven, but this loaf is amazing warm as well as cold. It stays fresh for days. How many will depend on the climate... it's best kept at room temperature, but this means that in a warmer climate, it may mould more quickly. Once it has been stored in the fridge, it is ok 'straight' but I prefer it toasted.
      When I freeze, I usually freeze from fresh for best results xx

      Delete
  3. Hi Kate, I made a batch this morning and although I have had a bit of a problem with my oven (operator error) the bread tastes great even though it has not been cooked properly, I think it will be OK toasted (I hate waste), but can I check the consistency with you please? you described it as very thick porridge, mine was so thick that it would not drop off the dough hook/spoon, I expected it to be softer like most GF recipes. I measured the 390ml of water (I thought pretty accurately), but might have been better weighing it in ml on the digital scales. BTW I made the FFF flour version. I will be trying again as it tastes so good.

    Many thanks for all your hard work and lovely recipes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alison.
      Thank You and you're welcome.
      Glad it tasted good, but doesn't sound as though your oven was most helpful! Should be great toasted either way.
      The 'dough consistency' will be very thick. I use a silicone spatula and it drops off in thick blobs which I then smooth in the tin with a wet spoon-back. It is not a runny batter, on account of the psyllium and oats which soak up the liquid. If you are worried, the dough will take an extra 10 to 20 ml water, but may need cooking for an extra 5 minutes. I know that FFF flour can be a little drier, so you could try this. As a first step though, I would DEFINITELY weigh the water. In my experience, this is most accurate and is something that I always do, having had varied results when I have used a measuring jug. Also make sure you are using LARGE eggs.
      I hope this helps and reassures xx

      Delete
    2. Thank you Kate, the eggs were the correct weight and I will weigh the water in future, and try the little extra water with the FFF flour, I will be trying the variations 1 and 2 also. xx

      Delete
    3. Fantastic Alison. Just go with an extra 10ml water to start! Let me know how you get on x

      Delete
  4. Wow - what a great looking loaf of bread! I love how much hard work you've put in to make it so good 😀 Thanks for linking it up to #cookblogshare! Eb x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Eb. It has definitely been a labour of love.... xx

      Delete
  5. Hi Alison. Writing in from New Delhi, India... dying to make this bread but cannot seem to find any teff flour here... is there a substitute you could recommend ? Thank you ��

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Anodita.
      That's such a shame and a little bit crazy, since it now appears to be being grown in India! Definitely worth doing some internet searching as it is an amazing flour with great protein and nutrient properties.
      As for alternatives.... I would suggest that you substitute with some additional sorghum and/or buckwheat flour OR possibly better... up the oat flour quantity (and add an extra 10g water) for version 1. I have also done a bit of research and although it is not a flour that I have ever heard of (so have no idea how it tastes, Ragi is a close cousin of Teff, so would be possibly worth using instead?
      Hope that helps. Let me know how you get on xx

      Delete
  6. Thank you Alison! I was beginning to despair after having discussed Teff with more than a few people on FB today!

    Yes I read about Ragi too - will experiment and hopefully the result will be fabulous!

    Else - should I just up the oat flour quantity to cover the 25 gms Teff in the rice free blend and increase the water as you suggest ?

    Excited to find light at the end of this gf bread tunnel! :))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome. My name's actually Kate, but no worries!
      I think you can probably replace the 25g with either oat flour or buckwheat... whichever you prefer. I would go with oat first and up the water by 10 or even 20g/ml and see how it goes. Best thing is to give it a try and see how it turns out. I've made with more oats and more liquid before and ended up with a decent loaf, so what's to lose? xx

      Delete
    2. Gosh sorry, no idea how I arrived at Alison!! My mind must be teff-ed! ;)

      Thank you, I am going to set about this bread today! Xx

      Delete
  7. Thank you for providing different versions, Kate. The bread looks absolutely beautiful. Thanks for sharing at Fiesta Friday party!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome Jhuls. It's the best bread Ive ever made! x

      Delete
  8. Gluten free bread is so much needed now-a-days - Pinning & Sharing this on facebook.

    Nice to be with Fiesta Friday event this week!

    Do check out how to make Ghee at home recipe and video.

    Second, some interesting facts about “Green Pepper” Bumps, some have 3 and some have 4. What is the significance and do both peppers taste same?

    Also, I am co-hosting this week’s FIESTA FRIDAY #287 and will be visiting and commenting on your posts as the official Fiesta Friday representative and features selector.

    Look forward to a fun party!

    Rita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Rita. I’ll be sure to do so x

      Delete
  9. I am a bread lover and this bread looks amazing! The texture of your bread looks great! Thanks so much for sharing with us at Full Plate Thursday. Hope you have a great week and come back to see us real soon!
    Miz Helen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. You’re welcome. It’s so exciting to have made a gluten free bread that tastes like bread, it had to be shared xx

      Delete
  10. Best bread ever! Well done Kate. I like it best made with milk kefir in the place of water and milk powder. But I have to disagree with you on one point...I love hot bread from the oven. It's the bakers treat to be able to get the first slice! That's the whole reason I make bread ;)!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Vicki. I’m very proud of my bread & really thrilled that people are enjoying it. I’ll have to give the kefir version a go.
      I’m not sure there is any disagreement on the bread straight out of the oven question though. I LOVE bread when it is fresh and hot! Especially that first crusty slice. It’s just a shame that some GF loaves are so rank when they are still hot. Not this one though. Although it was definitely easier to cut the smaller loaf xx

      Delete
  11. I am really checking for gluten free options due to thyroid issues. This is something I would love to try. Thanks for sharing in Blogging Pit Stop - Pit Stop Crew

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh bless you Menaka. Absolutely give this bread a go.... It is so much nicer than GF bread that you find in the shops. xx

      Delete
  12. What an outstanding recipe. I can actually comprehend the amount of work that went into getting this recipe just right. I take my baking hat off to you. I bet you feel super!This loaf looks incredible. Thank you so much for sharing this special recipe with #BakingCrumbs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jenny. Yes... it was a lot of hard work, but getting a decent GF loaf is the absolute holy grail of a Coeliac's food search. I am thrilled that I have achieved this and really hope that it brings joy to thousands of other bread-deprived gluten avoiders! x

      Delete
  13. Wow Kate, this loaf looks fantastic and if I didn't know that it was GF I wouldn't have guessed. The texture looks beautiful and as you would expect from any wheat loaf. I do applaud you and all the hard work trying and testing to get it perfect and all the happy customers who have tried it and loved it, that's the greatest feedback right there! :) Thank you for sharing this beauty with #BakingCrumbs :) xx

    ReplyDelete

I always LOVE to hear from you, so please leave a comment, share your thoughts and stay in touch.

By leaving a comment, you consent to any personal information you choose to share being collected by Gluten Free Alchemist for statistical and monitoring purposes and you enter into a public conversation linked to the post. You may choose to make your comment anonymous by ticking the relevant check-box. For full details of the GFA Privacy Policy, please click on the signposted label at the top of the page.