Tuesday, 30 July 2019

Incredible Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread - an easy to bake recipe full of wholegrain goodness (optional dairy free)


Do you dream of perfect wholemeal bread that is also gluten free? I know I did! It is one of those elusive 'desperately want' staples that evades the gluten free and coeliac experience and leaves you longing and hoping that it will one day be achievable. Well, my lovely readers, that day has come.... Meet my best ever Gluten Free Brown Bread.... It may turn out to be the only recipe you will ever need.

Anyone who follows the Gluten Free Alchemist Instagram feed or my Face Book Page will know that I have been teasing you with this loaf for months. I make no apology for the delay in bringing it to you. I had to be really and truly happy with it before I was willing to 'go public'... and yes... I AM a perfectionist and proud.


Don't think you're a baker? My Gluten Free Brown Bread recipe is easy to make and is good for you too...

Seriously, I hope this loaf will change the way you feel about gluten free bread... Real gluten free home-baked bread CAN be done.... and this is the loaf that proves it. It is simple and straightforward (once you have made it a couple of times, you get into a quick rhythm of pre-prepping the dry mix, which makes the rest child's play) and promises not only incredible texture, but also a great nutrition boost as well.


Easy to make, this gluten free brown bread is not only wholemeal, but contains no preservatives and no gums.... It is full of goodness from the gluten free oats, flax, psyllium and other wholegrain, protein-rich flours contained within and is enriched with eggs and milk (dairy free optional) for extra nutritionally-needed protein and vitamin D.

The eggs also help provide structure. Whilst I'm sure there must be a way to replicate without egg, I do not yet know what that is...

This bread doesn't crumble, is not dry, remains soft and lastingly fresh for days, toasts well, makes great sandwiches and tastes incredible... with (or without) any topping or filling. I do not make any of these claims lightly. This is not gluten free wholemeal bread that has been slung together hopefully.... It has been my work for many months... testing, honing, tweaking, re-testing over and over again until I can say hand on heart, I can tweak no more. This may be the best I can do (although those who know me will vouch that finding the key to making perfect gluten free bread (brown or otherwise) is an obsession of mine, that will no doubt continue into the future with ever-more variations and options).


I have always made my brown bread using 1 pound loaf tins, mainly because that's a good size for our needs. I would recommend you do the same, because I know this works (and I have no idea why, but I have never actually tried making it as a two-pound loaf). I usually use a metal tin the shape of the one photographed above, although it works just as well in a non-holed tin. I can also vouch for the eat one now, freeze one for later approach... The loaf freezes well, although may lose a tiny bit of 'elasticity' once defrosted. Just make sure it is well wrapped in a sealed bag before freezing (I have just one bag that I keep using for each batch to save on plastic waste).

The recipes below include a corn and buckwheat free version as I know these ingredients can cause issues for some people. The next stage development for my gluten free wholemeal bread is to try and vary to a non-oat version for the oat-intolerant among you, but I am also testing for a bread-maker version too. If there are any other flours on the list that you cannot eat or tolerate, please please leave me a comment or send an e-mail and I will offer alternatives and substitutes.


What do other people think of my Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread?

The final recipe that I share with you here, has been mixed, proved, baked and eaten every week at GFHQ for months. It consistently rises, has a consistent texture and consistently brings a smile to all our faces. Even Mr GF who is a gluten-eater when away from home (god-forbid, I would never let gluten cross the threshold here...) thinks it is amazingly good and compares with the expectations of wholemeal wheat bread (it certainly comes darn close to my recollections, both for texture and flavour).


Actually... He goes further in telling me that it is better than wheat bread. Now... I could tell myself that he is just being nice because I am married to him, but believe me when I tell you that Mr GF and indeed Miss GF are my harshest critics... These guys really don't beat around the bush when they don't like something I have made, or when they think it isn't up to standard... THIS bread surpasses the grade with both of them.

Praise for my recipe doesn't stop at home though. I have shared my wholemeal bread with friends, family and with several others when I attended a Life Reboot Camp weekend. I also gave a version of the loaf made with Fairy Flour to the Free From Fairy herself (who shared it with her sister), when I attended the Free From & Allergy Show in London. I have been both humbled and proud of the positive comments it has received.


What is the best way to get ingredients ready to make my Gluten Free Brown Bread?

You may be looking down the list of flours and thinking 'blimy... that's a lot of ingredients'.... and yes, you are most definitely right. Sometimes, when you are aiming for gluten free wholemeal bread perfection, you have to push the boat out and throw the entire contents of the larder at it until you find just the right combination. But actually, most of the base flours are in proportion with my tried and tested home-blended rice-free flour blend, so if you keep the blend pre-mixed and ready, adding the additional or alternative flours is no trouble at all. Alternatively, you can use pre-blended Fairy Flour (version 4 of the recipe has been tried with this blend), if you want to simplify things (you can get six 1-pound loaves with one bag of her flour plus the other ingredients used in the recipe).


If you are not sure where to find the flours needed, it's worth checking with your local health food shop (independents are particularly willing to order in for you, if they don't have them already), but I also often buy on-line from Healthy Supplies or Shipton Mill and some of you may still be eligible to get some individual pure flours on prescription. Sadly, we no longer can... If you are outside the UK, you probably know your flour sources better than I would, but if you are not sure, go on line and just double check the GF status of any flour you buy.

Because I use oat flour so often (making wholemeal bread at least once a week), I make sure I have a stash ready and waiting in an airtight container in the larder (I have always ground my own in the blender using gluten free oats.... it's cheaper and more accessible). I also have a small airtight container of psyllium husk powder (available from many health food stores) which I grind at home too.

In fact, what I usually do (because I make this loaf every week), is keep a separate airtight container handy and then when I get a spare moment, I mix up all the dry ingredients for the bread recipe and set aside, prepped for my Friday night/Saturday morning bake session. This means that making gluten free wholemeal bread dough literally takes me 20 minutes and then I twiddle my thumbs or chill with a mug of coffee and a book for less than an hour more, whilst it proves and bakes... Job done! I may have it down to a fine art, but really, it is so easy once you have made it a couple of times.


I have tested the recipe for my gluten free brown bread with dozens of flour combinations to get to the recipes that I share with you here. Heads up though... occasionally when the bread cools after baking, it sucks in slightly at the sides. The 'sucking-in' is randomly intermittent and I have no idea why it happens. Either way, it does not affect the final texture of the bread, but the shape of each slice may not be a perfect 'square'.

So without any more waffle... here it is. The recipe that I have wanted to share with you for so long... my Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread. If you have any questions, please contact me either by e-mail or in the comments below and I will do my best to make amazing gluten free brown bread as easy and accessible for you as possible...

And please.... if you do make it, let me know how you got on. I would LOVE to hear from you!


Note added after publishing : If you don't have any milk powder, you can use a straight sub of water quantity for milk, but it is important that you heat it to the right temperature, before adding to the mixture. The use of milk powder is because it is generally easier to get water to the correct temperature and to boil a kettle than to heat milk in a microwave or saucepan to the correct temperature (with less washing up). You can also take the dry mix self-catering, ready to whip up some bread whilst on holiday.

A number of people have now made this bread using one 2 lb tin. I understand that it has mostly worked well, although cooking time will need adjustment. Those who have used a larger tin have adjusted oven temperature and timings as follows : 20 mins at 200 C/Gas 6,  then turn oven down to 180 C/Gas 4 for a further 40 minutes. If concerned that the loaf is browning to quickly, pop a piece of foil over the top towards the end. 

Vicki (Free From Fairy) has also made an alternative version using milk kefir. She uses a straight sub of home-made kefir for the same volume of water (removing any additional milk powder from the recipe).

If you make any alternative versions, please let me know! 


gluten free; bread; recipe; home-baked; wholegrain; wholemeal; dairy free
Bread; Baking; Recipes; Gluten Free; Dairy Free
Bread
Yield: Two 1 pound loaves
Author:

Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread

A perfect gluten free wholemeal brown loaf made with oat and other wholegrain flours. This easy-to-make loaf stays fresh for days, makes amazing sandwiches, toasts beautifully and tastes delicious. Freezes well.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 25 Mtotal time: 75 M

ingredients:

Version 1 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (original)
  • 250g Gluten Free Alchemist Rice Free Blend from this post (equivalent to 50g sorghum flour; 25g white teff flour; 25g buckwheat flour; 80g tapioca starch flour; 30g potato starch flour; 40g corn flour (starch))
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 2 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (slightly more earthy & dark)
  • 160g GFA Rice Free Blend from this post
  • 90g additional teff flour (white or brown)
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 3 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (No Corn; No Buckwheat)
  • 80g sorghum flour
  • 80g white (or brown) teff flour
  • 60g tapioca starch flour
  • 30g potato starch flour
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins
Version 4 : Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread (with Free From Fairy Plain Wholegrain Flour)
  • 250g Free From Fairy plain GF wholegrain flour
  • 130g gluten free oat flour (easy to make at home by grinding GF oats using a blender)
  • 18g flax seed 
  • 35g ground psyllium husk (grind into a powder in a blender)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 3 tablespoons dried milk powder (or 2 tablespoons coconut milk powder)
  • 7g active dried yeast (I use Allinsons Easy Bake)
  • 3 large eggs (combined weight in shells 195-200g)
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon runny honey
  • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 390g (ml) hand-warm water (46 C/114 F)
  • A little extra oil/butter and brown rice flour/ extra sorghum or buckwheat flour to coat the inside of the bread tins

instructions:

How to cook Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread

  1. Mix together the dry ingredients (flours, oat, flax, psyllium husk, salt, bicarbonate of soda, milk powder and yeast) in an airtight container and shake vigorously to blend.
  2. Very lightly grease the inside of two one pound non-stick bread tins using either a little butter or oil, base line the tin with a piece of baking paper (cut to size) and then gently coat the sides of the tin with a light dusting of brown rice flour/buckwheat flour/sorghum flour (put a teaspoon of flour in the tin and gently turn from side to side until coated. Tip out any excess).
  3. In a large bowl, lightly beat together the eggs, oil, honey and lemon juice to combine.
  4. Add the warm water and briefly whisk through to mix with the other wet ingredients. It will foam slightly, but this is fine.
  5. Whilst the liquid is still warm, add the dry ingredients and using either a dough hook or beating with a silicone/wooden spoon/spatula, mix until well blended.
  6. Place the bowl to one side and leave to sit for 3 to 5 minutes to enable the flours to absorb the liquid, before beating again. You should now have a dough 'batter' that resembles very thick porridge.
  7. Split the batter between the two tins evenly and using the back of a spoon (dipped in cold water), smooth the tops.
  8. Place the tins in a warm place to rise for about 25 minutes - I place the tins on a folded tea towel in the oven at 80C for a perfect prove (the bread should rise approx 2 to 3 cm (max) above the tin with a gently rounded top).
  9. Pre-heat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4. When the dough has risen, bake for about 25 minutes until nicely browned and firm. 
  10. Remove from the oven and take out of the tins (you may need to gently release the sides using a spatula or flat knife) and leave to cool on a wire rack. 
  11. As with all bread, this loaf is easiest to cut when left to cool completely, although (unlike most gluten free bread) it tastes totally delicious when still warm.
  12. Wrap in clingfilm or put in a sealable bag to store and keep fresh. Store at room temperature if possible. 

NOTES:

Preparation time : 25 minutes for mixture (including weighing and standing time) 25 minutes to prove 25 minutes to bake If you cannot eat dairy, substitute the milk powder with a dairy-free alternative (depending on the milk-base, the flavour may be affected slightly, although I have used coconut milk powder and it has not been noticeable). I have tested this recipe on a huge variety of flour combinations. You may find on occasion, that as the loaf cools, it sucks in slightly at the sides. I have no idea why this happens and it does not seem to be relevant to the blend or tin used. It will not affect the flavour, texture or crumb of the final loaf.
Created using The Recipes Generator

I am sharing this incredible Gluten Free Wholemeal Brown Bread Recipe with :

 

Cook Blog Share with Easy Peasy Foodie
Full Plate Thursday #443 with Miz Helen's Country Cottage
Fiesta Friday #287 with Angie, The Not So Creative Cook and Parsi Cuisine


Baking Crumbs with Apply to Face Blog and Jo's Kitchen Larder
The Bloggers Pit Stop

What's for Dinner with The Lazy Gastronome

Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-19 unless otherwise indicated



Wednesday, 17 July 2019

Spiced Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins - gluten free; optional dairy free


What do you eat for breakfast in the morning? I admit I can be pretty lax on eating first thing, but when I have healthy grab-and-go offerings in the house, like these gluten free Spiced Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins, I am a breakfast-eater through and through.

Mornings can be pretty hectic at GFHQ and there is little time to spend slaving over a frying pan or making waffle batter, so if we are to be tempted to eat, we really do need something that we can eat on the run. Even a bowl of cereal takes too much time. These breakfast muffins are a perfect start to the day. Quick to make the day or more before (the addition of ground almonds and sweet potato keeps them soft and moist for longer), you can eat them fresh, or freeze them ready to throw them in the microwave for a few seconds to defrost before you run out the door.


What's in my gluten free Spiced Sweet Potato Muffins?
Made with Fullgreen Sweet Potato Vegi Rice, they also contain hidden healthy veggie stuff (although you would never know). Sweet potato is full of goodness... a great source of fibre and of vitamins and minerals (particularly vitamins B and C and the anti-oxidant beta carotene). But these breakfast muffins are nutritious too for the ground almonds (full of protein, mono-unsaturated fat and vitamin E), protein and fibre-rich flours (the blend includes sorghum, teff and buckwheat) and also eggs (a fantastic source of protein and all important Vitamin D) they contain. In fact, the ingredients list is perfect for that all-important slow-release energy burn needed to sustain you until lunch.

Although I make them with butter (because we can...), they are just as delicious made with a dairy free alternative spread or coconut oil. They are also lower sugar, being naturally sweetened by the sweet potato, but with the addition of just a little soft light brown or coconut sugar (I've stuck with less-refined options, which are not only a little better for you, but also provide a richer caramel hit to the bake).


You can probably make my sweet potato muffins with a bog-standard supermarket bag of gluten free flour (although you may need to add a little more liquid), but I am of the view that when baking gluten free, getting the flour blend right is crucial to the end result. I am not a fan of standard rice-filled blends, not only because they are nutritionally devoid (and have a potential risk from arsenic levels), but because they leave baked goods with a gritty, dry texture that can be quite unpleasant to eat. Eating (even the healthy variety) should be pleasurable from every angle and so I have developed my own easy to mix-at-home flour blends which provide a better balance. These muffins are made with my Gluten Free Alchemist rice-free flour blend which you can find at the end of my flours page. Don't ever be put off by the 'hassle' of mixing your own flour blends. It really is simple and it also means you have the flexibility to vary or add alternatives into the mix, either if there are particular flours you cannot tolerate (such as corn or buckwheat) or to achieve a different desired end result. And guess what? I did a load of research for you and have provided a great list of flours and basic guide to flour blending to give you a head start...

If you still can't be tempted to mix your own, the Free From Fairy makes a great alternative rice free blend.


What sparked my creativity to make these Spiced Sweet Potato Muffins?
If you read my last post, you will know that I also made healthier Spiced Sweet Potato Baked Doughnuts, after being challenged at the Free From Show in London by the Fullgreen team (who have joined with Hip & Healthy) to make something using their Sweet Potato Vegi Rice. The problem was, I only have one doughnut tin and there was twice as much batter as I needed for 6 doughnuts.

Now I could have waited the very short time it took to bake the first batch before refilling the tin with the rest of the batter, but frankly, I couldn't be bothered to wait... so I grabbed a muffin tin and some cases and got spooning.

It could have been a complete disaster. Not all bake mixes are versatile enough to change shape and still have the desired texture... but this one worked perfectly. My sweet potato muffins are just sweet enough without the maple glaze that was added to the doughnuts to make a perfect healthier bake!


How to eat my Gluten Free Alchemist Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins
Sure you can eat them naked for the quickest (and probably healthiest) option, but sometimes life needs a little decadence, whenever it falls in the day.

My favourite additions to the the straight-up sweet potato muffin are a little thick or whipped honey, or best of all, a layer of Flat Brew Espresso Coffee Spread. Man, that stuff is good (assuming you like coffee). I have to admit, I am a little obsessed!

Whatever you add (or don't), these muffins pair perfectly with that all-important cup of morning coffee or tea, so whether you have time to do breakfast at home, or have made it to the office with them still uneaten (yeah... I challenge you!), pull up a chair, grab a cuppa and enjoy! x


Gluten Free Spiced Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins (optional dairy free)


Yield: Approximately 12
Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:
Perfectly Spiced and not too sweet, these Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins are a healthy start to the day, packed with goodness and nutrients. But don't feel you need to save them for breakfast... they make a great snack at any time of the day.

ingredients:

  • 160g rice free flour blend (as in this post) or alternative GF flour blend (preferably rice free)
  • 80g ground almonds/almond meal
  • 1½ teaspoons ground psyllium husk powder
  • pinch fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon GF baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger powder
  • 50g unsalted butter/dairy free spread/coconut oil (butter should be softened; coconut oil should be melted)
  • 120g soft light brown sugar/coconut sugar
  • 3 large eggs (preferably free range)
  • 200g (1 bag) Full Green Sweet Potato Vegi Rice (or equivalent weight mashed/riced cooked sweet potato)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

instructions:

How to cook Gluten Free Spiced Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins (optional dairy free)

  1. Prepare a muffin tin ready with medium-sized muffin cases. Preheat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4.
  2. Weigh and mix together the dry ingredients (flour; almonds; psyllium; salt, baking powder; bicarbonate of soda; spices) and set aside. Tip : weigh into an airtight container and shake vigorously to mix.
  3. Beat together the butter/spread/melted coconut oil with the brown sugar until light and fluffy.
  4. Add and beat in the eggs one at a time until well blended and slightly lighter in colour.
  5. Add the sweet potato and vanilla extract and beat again until well-blended.
  6. Add the dry ingredients to the wet mix and lightly fold through until evenly blended.
  7. Spoon the batter into the muffin cases (about two-thirds full) and smooth the tops. Bake for 12 to 14 minutes until firm and springy (be careful not to over-bake, or the muffins will become dry).
  8. Carefully remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool completely (cover with a clean cloth whilst cooling)
Created using The Recipes Generator

I am also sharing these Sweet Potato Breakfast Muffins with :

 

Cook Blog Share with Curly's Cooking
Baking Crumbs with Jo's Kitchen Larder and Apply To Face Blog
Fiesta Friday #285 with Angie




Full Plate Thursday #441 with Miz Helen's Country Cottage
Dare to Share Saturday with DIY Party Mom and Pam's Party & Practical Tips

Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-19 unless otherwise indicated

Monday, 15 July 2019

Healthier Spiced Sweet Potato Baked Doughnuts (gluten free; optional dairy free) with Maple Glaze


Meet my gluten free Sweet Potato Baked Doughnuts or should that be baked 'donuts'? They're awesomely good and way healthier than most doughnuts you'll find. They are wholesome not only for the ingredients they contain, but because they are baked doughnuts, rather than fried.

I've yet to meet anyone who doesn't love a doughnut. If you are Coeliac or a gluten-avoider though, a decent gluten free doughnut is an elusive treat (I know... I've hunted high and low for them...). Equally, if you fancy a doughnut but have a health-conscience, you're pretty much stuffed! So these, my healthy but 'intolerant' friends are for you...


Anyone who has followed Gluten Free Alchemist for some time will know that I love a challenge. My creativity is most inspired when given an ingredient or some strange specific 'guideline' (like a colour, ingredient or foodie event) that I have to incorporate into a new recipe.

These sweet potato doughnuts are the result of one such provocation and are developed in response to a sweet potato challenge thrown to me at the Allergy and Free From Show last week by the team from Fullgreen, in partnership with Hip and Healthy. The specifics of the challenge were to create a recipe using Fullgreen's Sweet Potato Vegi Rice. I'm all for finding ways to hide veggies in treats to make them healthier (and to sneakily get the kids to eat more good stuff), so a sweet bake (which would also harness the natural sweetness of the sweet potato) seemed the way to go.


We already often eat Fullgreen's Vegi Rice products at GFHQ (they do a variety of cauliflower rices in addition to the sweet potato), mainly because I can't be bothered with the hassle and mess of 'ricing' cauliflower and other veg, when I can buy it already prepped in a bag (yeah... I know I'm really lazy), but I have never tried baking with it. Heaven only knows why, because it has to be one of the easiest, most time-efficient ways there is to bake with veggies... No peeling, chopping, grinding, grating, pulsing, steaming or extra washing up. You just tip the bag into your mix at the right time and bobs-your-uncle, veggies included!

The recipe for these gluten free doughnuts is also so versatile that I have used the batter base for an alternative bake which I will share with you very soon. I'm really thrilled with how it (eventually) turned out. I admit the final recipe was the end result of three trials (fortunately I had a couple of spare bags of Fullgreen's Sweet Potato Vegi Rice in the larder in addition to the one they kindly gave me at the Free From Show).


The sweet potato adds moistness as well as goodness to the doughnuts without any obvious hint of 'veg' (my daughter and her friend didn't come anywhere near guessing the 'secret ingredient') and whilst I used butter for a little decadence (and because we can eat dairy), they work equally well with both a good dairy free spread or with coconut oil (I have tested!).

These particular baked doughnuts need less sugar because of the natural sweetness of the potato, although I have mixed in a little of the less refined variety. You can use either light soft brown or coconut sugar, both of which are better from a health-perspective as well as offering a lovely caramel hit on the tastebuds.

The addition of nutritionally-rich ground almonds (high protein, low carb, with great levels of healthy mono-unsaturated fat and vitamin E) is not only good for you, but helps keep the doughnuts fresh for days (if you can make them last that long) and I've also used my home mixed Gluten Free Alchemist rice free flour blend both for the best texture and because the blend incorporates protein and fibre-rich whole grain gluten free flours.


Although the glaze contains a cheeky bit of icing sugar, the bulk of its luscious sweetness comes from the use of natural maple syrup, which not only gives a beautiful caramel colour, but tastes divine and pairs perfectly with the warming cinnamon and ginger spices in the doughnut.

Want to know how good these gluten free sweet potato doughnuts are? When I gave them to my daughter's friend (who is a usual gluten eater), she told me that they were 'the best doughnuts she had ever eaten'... which makes me happy that they are good enough to share with you too. Go on... give them a go (and of course, let me know if you do and tag me on social media... I love to see what you have all been making)!


Gluten Free Spiced Sweet Potato Baked Doughnuts (optional dairy free)


Yield: 12 doughnuts
Author:
prep time: 30 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 45 M
Delicious, healthier gluten free sweet potato baked doughnuts drizzled with a deliciously decadent maple glaze.

ingredients:

Sweet Potato Doughnuts
  • 160g rice free flour blend (as in this post) or alternative rice free blend
  • 80g ground almonds/almond meal
  • 1½ teaspoons ground psyllium husk powder
  • pinch fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon GF baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger powder
  • 50g unsalted butter/dairy free spread/coconut oil (butter should be softened; coconut oil should be melted)
  • 120g soft light brown sugar/coconut sugar
  • 3 large eggs (preferably free range)
  • 200g (1 bag) Full Green Sweet Potato Vegi Rice (or equivalent weight mashed/riced cooked sweet potato)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Maple Glaze
  • 60g butter/dairy free spread
  • 120 ml maple syrup
  • 125g icing/confectioner's sugar (sifted)
  • roasted chopped nuts (optional) to decorate

instructions:

How to cook Gluten Free Spiced Sweet Potato Baked Doughnuts (optional dairy free)

Doughnuts
  1. Prepare a doughnut tin by lightly greasing the doughnut holes (Tip : use cake release paste/spray). Preheat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4.
  2. Weigh and mix together the dry ingredients (flour; almonds; psyllium; salt, baking powder; bicarbonate of soda; spices) and set aside. Tip :  weigh into an airtight container and shake vigorously to mix.
  3. Beat together the butter/spread/melted coconut oil with the brown sugar until light and fluffy.
  4. Add and beat in the eggs one at a time until well blended and slightly lighter in colour.
  5. Add the sweet potato and vanilla extract and beat again until well-blended.
  6. Add the dry ingredients to the wet mix and lightly fold through until evenly blended.
  7. Pipe the dough batter into the holes in the doughnut tray and bake for about 10 to 12 minutes until firm and springy (be careful not to over-bake, or the doughnuts will become dry).
  8. Carefully remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool completely (cover with a clean cloth whilst cooling)
Maple Glaze
  1. In a small saucepan stirring over a low heat, or in a microwave (30 second bursts at medium, stirring frequently), melt the butter/spread into the maple syrup and mix until well-blended.
  2. Remove from the heat and whisk in the icing/confectioner's sugar.
  3. Leave to cool (stirring intermittently) until the glaze has thickened to a light coating consistency.
  4. Dip each doughnut (Tip : dip the 'fluffy' side) into the glaze and place on baking paper or a wire rack (glaze side up). Sprinkle with chopped, roasted nuts (optional) and leave (either at room temperature or in the fridge) to allow the glaze to set.

NOTES:

This recipe makes 12 doughnuts, for which you will need two six-hole doughnut tins. If you only have one, make 6 doughnuts and make the rest into doughnut muffins or mini cakes.
Created using The Recipes Generator
I am also sharing my gluten free spiced sweet potato baked doughnuts with :

 

Cook Blog Share with Curly's Cooking
Baking Crumbs with Jo's Kitchen Larder and Apply To Face Blog
What's for Dinner #209 with The Lazy Gastronome

 


Inspire Me Monday #391 with Create With Joy
Dare to Share Saturday #374 with Pam's Party & Practical Tips and Kandy Kreations
Fiesta Friday #284 with Angie, Of Goats & Greens and Food, Eat Love


Weekend Potluck #385 with The Country Cook

Snickerdoodle Create Bake Make Party #292 with Across The Boulevard, Two Chicks & a Mum; Sew Crafty Crochet, This Autoimmune Life and Eye Love Knots



Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-19 unless otherwise indicated

Saturday, 8 June 2019

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies (gluten free & dairy free)


Hands up, who loves the fudgiest of fudgy chocolate cookies? The ones with a lightly crisp exterior, encasing a brownie-like middle? That your teeth sink into and are slightly sticky and chewy?... Yes? That's a lot of hands out there! Need the recipe? You're going to LOVE my new gluten free Chocolate Crinkle Cookies.


Crinkle, Crackle or Brookies Cookies?
I say Crinkle Cookies... but are they? I need some help on this guys. I wasn't sure whether they should be called crackle or crinkle cookies. And then again, are they actually Crinkle Brookies? For those of you who haven't heard of a 'Brookie', it is (I am told) the cross between a cookie and a brownie. If you look for the origins and description of Brookies on the web, you first and foremost get something that (in various shapes and layers) looks like a combination of biscuit and brownie cake... which you'd be right in thinking this is not. But you also get plenty of references to a soft, gooey, chocolatey cookie that has the internal consistency of a brownie... which these most certainly are... but with the added bonus of a pretty crinkle top.


At GFHQ, the jury's out. Are they Crinkle Cookies? Crackle Cookies? or Crinkle Brookies?
Actually, it's probably all split hairs. What they are is decadently moreish, delicious mounds of squidgy chocolatey scrumptiousness. But for the sake of argument (and so that they at least have a sense of identity), today I will be calling them gluten free Chocolate Crinkle Cookies.

They are also one of the most photogenic things I have made in a long time. It doesn't matter which way you look at them, they are totally catwalk-worthy.... which whilst not that relevant to ultimate taste satisfaction, when you are trying to make them look as desirable as possible, does actually matter. The crackle on the cookie makes all the difference!


Getting the best texture in a gluten free Crinkle Cookie
How often do you find yourself eating gluten free cookies and biscuits that are dry or gritty and think that since you are Coeliac or gluten-intolerant, this is what you have to put up with? Here at Gluten Free Alchemist, I don't see why people who have to avoid gluten should accept any bake that isn't as good as, or better than wheat-based bakes. Texture matters as much as taste and that means that before I put out any recipe, I work and re-work each set of ingredients to get the best possible result.

Although you can make these Crinkle Cookies with a standard rice-based commercial gluten free flour blend, they simply won't taste as good. Trust me... I've tried it, You lose the smooth and gooey texture that makes them what they are. Sometimes you have to get creative and that means making a blend to fit the bake that you want to achieve.


Although for many of the bakes at Gluten Free Alchemist I do use one of my two main home blends (either blend A or my rice-free flour blend) for these chocolate crinkle cookies, I have blended together a specific ratio of sorghum, tapioca, buckwheat and corn flours to get the texture just right. I make no apology. If you want the perfect gluten free cookie, you have to find the right mix.

Why do Crinkle Cookies Crinkle?
Whether you call them crinkle or crackle cookies, have you ever wondered why that beautiful cracked surface exists? Apparently (according to Cooks Illustrated), it's all to do with the speed with which the top of the cookie dries out in the oven. If it dries before the cookie has finished rising (the sugar coating being key to drawing the moisture from the surface), the continued internal spreading causes the white icing sugar-coated surface to crack, pull apart and harden, leaving a beautiful crinkly pattern.


Personally I much prefer deep, wide fissures, but if you like your crinkles to have more of a close-knit 'shattered' look, the scientists at America's Test Kitchen suggest giving the dough-balls a double-coating of granulated sugar, followed by icing sugar. The coarser granules in the granulated sugar apparently accelerate the drying process due to their ability to dissolve and re-crystallise in the heat of the oven, leading to a surface that dries faster with more cracks!

However you love your crackles, one things for sure, these Chocolate Crinkle Cookies are wonderfully moreish, easy to make and perfect for every occasion. But don't take my word for it... whip up your own batch and let me know what you think.


Once you've enjoyed a batch of Chocolate Crinkle Cookies, tempt yourself with my other lovely Gluten Free Alchemist Cookies. Check out these babies...

Soft Italian Amaretti Cookies
Dark & Chewy Chocolate-Peanut Butter Cookies
Ginger Cookies
Chewy Toffee-Apple Cookies
Chocolate-Banana-Coconut Macaroon Cookies
Soft Nutty Cookie Mounds
Oat Choc-Chunk Cookies
Nutella Thumbprint Cookies
Jammy Thumbprint Cookies
Baci Di Dama Italian Cookies
Chocolate-Espresso Puddle Cookies



Yield: Approx 25 cookies
Author: Gluten Free Alchemist

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies - gluten free

A deliciously fudgy gluten free chocolate cookie which is easy to make and perfectly crinkled.
prep time: 25 Mcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 37 M

ingredients:

  • 45g sorghum flour
  • 40g tapioca flour
  • 25g buckwheat flour
  • 25g corn flour (starch)
  • 1 teaspoon GF baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 190g caster sugar (preferably golden)
  • 50g cocoa powder
  • 70g coconut oil (melted)
  • 2 large eggs - room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 50g icing sugar (to coat cookies)

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Crinkle Cookies - gluten free

  1. Weigh and mix together the flours, baking powder, salt and xanthan gum until well blended (I weigh into an airtight container and shake vigorously). Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the sugar, cocoa powder and melted coconut oil until evenly blended. 
  3. Add the eggs and vanilla extract and vigorously beat together with a wooden/silicone spoon.
  4. Add the dry ingredients and beat again until smooth.
  5. Chill the ingredients for 1 to 2 hours until firmed up.
  6. Prepare a couple of large baking trays by base-lining with baking paper. Pre-heat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4. 
  7. Once chilled and firm, scoop out spoonfuls of cookie dough (approx walnut size) and roll into balls with your hands. 
  8. Place the icing sugar into a bowl and dip each dough ball, rolling around until fully coated in icing sugar. Once coated, place each ball on the baking trays about two inches apart. Very lightly press the top of each ball to flatten slightly.
  9. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes and remove from the oven. 
  10. Leave on the trays for a further 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

NOTES:

You can replace the flours with a standard gluten free flour blend (135g), but I recommend you use the ratio of flours as stated above. Rice-based blends in particular will significantly affect the texture of the cookie, giving a more gritty and drier result. Times displayed without dough chilling time.
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These gluten free Chocolate Crinkle Cookies are shared with :

 

Cook Blog Share with Recipes Made Easy
Baking Crumbs with Apply to Face Blog and Jo's Kitchen Larder
Fiesta Friday #279 with Angie, Spades, Spatulas & Spoons and Apply to Face Blog 




Foodie Friday #93 with Back to my Southern Roots
Dare to Share Saturday #369 with Pam's Party & Practical Tips and Kandy Kreations
Saturday Sharefest with The Sway

Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-19 unless otherwise indicated