Welcome to my blog, through which I hope to be able to share my experiences of gluten free cooking, baking, experimenting and eating.
When my daughter was diagnosed (age 6) with Coeliac Disease, our world of eating changed overnight. From breads, pastry and pasta to cakes, biscuits and puddings.......... suddenly most of what we knew was 'off the menu'. I think I must have tested every available gluten free product on the market, seeking out replacements to try and keep things as normal as possible. I was disappointed to find that what was available was often dry, crumbly and flavourless.
Not one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to turn my kitchen into a laboratory, turn all I knew about cooking on its head and start creating!

Wednesday, 26 February 2014

Chewy Apricot, Apple, Cinnamon & Maple Flapjacks - and a story about flapjack triangles.....


I have it on the authority of my 8 year old, that these flapjacks are REALLY good. So much so that the cheeky mare has been trying to weedle them out of me for breakfast, snacks, lunch and tea!

I needed to make some more flapjack to send with her to school for her lunch time puds and in my search for inspiration of new flavours, I hit the google search button. I can't say that it gave me any new ideas on the recipe front, but I did come across a completely crazy story about a school in Essex, UK who banned triangular flapjacks after they were deemed dangerous............ Apparently one got lobbed across the lunch hall and it hit a boy in the face, causing a sore eye. As a result, the canteen staff were told they could no longer make triangles - only squares and rectangles.


Is it just me, or has health & safety gone bonkers??? Since when was a flapjack considered to be an offensive weapon? And wouldn't a square one be just as 'risky' if thrown with enough force? It seems ludicrous to me that they would blame the flapjack rather than the behaviour. Shame on them!

As a compensatory tribute to the wrongly accused and banned Essex school pudding (and a kick in the teeth to ridiculous health and safety decisions), I have especially and proudly cut my flapjacks into triangles. I reckon they might even taste better this way! I am a bit worried about sending them into school though............ do you think I should label them 'dangerous if thrown'?


Soft and chewy, these flapjack triangles are extremely delicious and very moreish. The maple syrup adds a Canadian touch of natural sweet luxury against the beautiful healthy creaminess of the oats. Each bite is bursting with chewy, tart, fruity apple and apricot, contrasting against the sweetness and adding an alternative texture and dimension.


I know the jury is probably still out on the soft, chewy vs crisp, biscuity flapjack, but I know where my vote is placed and these definitely hit the spot if you prefer the former. This recipe should be pretty versatile too.............. I reckon you could add any variety of fruit, nuts or seeds. Next time I think I will try cherry and pecan............ or maybe pear and brazil nut........ or........Mmmmmm.... the possibilities are endless........


Chewy Apricot, Apple, Cinnamon & Maple Flapjacks

Ingredients   

250g unsalted butter
175g soft brown sugar
120g golden syrup
60g maple syrup
3 teaspoons ground cinnamon
360g gluten free porridge oats
1 large cooking apple - cored, peeled and chopped into small cubes
85g dried apricots - chopped into small pieces

Method

  1. Base line a 9 inch square baking tin with baking paper and pre-heat the oven to 160 C/320 F/Gas 3.
  2. In a large non-stick saucepan, melt and mix the butter, sugar, syrups and cinnamon over a low heat, stirring frequently.
  3. Remove from the heat and stir in the oats, apple and apricot until evenly combined.
  4. Spoon the mixture into the baking tin and spread evenly. Gently compress the top with the back of a spoon.
  5. Bake for about 25 to 35 minutes until golden brown and starting to firm up at the edges. 
  6. Remove from the oven and leave in the tin to cool. Whilst still warm, mark out the slices with a sharp knife.
  7. When the flapjack has cooled, remove form the tin and cut into pieces.

Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013-14 unless otherwise indicated

2 comments:

  1. These look delicious. I love the sound of using a bit of chopped fresh apple in them too. THey look the perfect chewy soft texture.
    I remember that triangle flapjack article. If you think about it squares and rectangles are even worse than triangles as they have even more corners! They should have gone for circles. Crazy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ...... brilliant!.... That would really set a conundrum for the kitchen staff ....... how to make circular flapjacks!!!!

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