Welcome to my blog, through which I hope to be able to share my experiences of gluten free cooking, baking, experimenting and eating.
When my daughter was diagnosed (age 6) with Coeliac Disease, our world of eating changed overnight. From breads, pastry and pasta to cakes, biscuits and puddings.......... suddenly most of what we knew was 'off the menu'. I think I must have tested every available gluten free product on the market, seeking out replacements to try and keep things as normal as possible. I was disappointed to find that what was available was often dry, crumbly and flavourless.
Not one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to turn my kitchen into a laboratory, turn all I knew about cooking on its head and start creating!

Wednesday, 3 April 2013

Gluten Free Flour & Flour Blends

This post has been updated to a page 'Gluten Free Flours & Flour Blends' which details a large range of gluten free flours and provides information on blending.
You will also find mix ratios for the two main Gluten Free Alchemist Blends (blend A as below and an alternative rice-free blend with wholegrain flours) used across recipes on this blog.

Happy blending!


How to make gluten free oat flour


Grind gluten free oats in a blender or food processor for 15 to 20 seconds until you have a fine powder.


Either grind weight for weight for each recipe (same weight of oats to required oat flour quantity). 

Or....... grind in bulk and store in an airtight container ready for use. 

 Alchemist gluten free flour blend (A)

Ingredients (makes 650g) - store in an airtight container

200g white rice flour                    110g corn flour
125g brown rice flour                  120g tapioca flour
95g potato starch (flour)             5g xanthan gum
Weigh all the ingredients into an airtight container. Seal the lid closed and shake well to mix.

Note : Potato Starch may be labelled 'Potato Starch (flour)'. It should still be potato starch.

An alternative flour mix (B)

When we first had to eat gluten free, I tried a whole bunch of flour mixes before I settled on the one above. Quite early on I found this white gluten free four mix in the book 'gluten-free bread & cakes from your breadmaker', by Carolyn Humphries (2004) and found it worked pretty well in many recipes. It produces a heavier and more dense bake than my own mix, but I have reproduced it here as I still use it for some recipes (such as trifle sponges) where I want a texture with more density and bite. Thank you Carolyn!

Ingredients (makes 650g) - store in an airtight container

50g tapioca flour (or buckwheat flour)                  100g potato starch (flour)
50g corn flour                                                     450g white rice flour
Weigh all the ingredients into an airtight container. Seal the lid closed and shake well to mix.
Gluten Free Alchemist © 2013 unless otherwise indicated.

6 comments:

  1. An excellent round up of all the flours on the market. Love how you have given their nutritional properties too. I love experimenting with new flours. I've only recently disocvered Masa harina, so will have to try is as you suggested for tortillas

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    1. Thank you Katie. As you can see, I am very new to blogging, so I really appreciate that you have taken the time to read me! Good luck with the tortillas....

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  2. I have tried your cheese scones and they are delicious! Thank you so much for sharing. I was just wondering which recipes call for your flour blends. I have made up the first one but now dont know how to use it. I will definitwly be trying some of your other recipes or sure! Thanks hain, Sharon

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    1. I am so pleased you like them Sharon. I use my flour blends (mainly A) in just about anything I make (other than where I specify a specific individual flour). I use it as a substitute for the commercially available GF blends as I have found it to be less 'ricey/gritty' and it produces a far more even-textured bake which is more akin to traditional wheat textures. Some GF bakes call for specific individual flour (tapioca, buck wheat, sorghum, etc) combinations which I always specify (sometimes alongside the GF blend). Does that all make sense??

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  3. Nice! I am definitely going to try the Blend A! At present I use Doves but still find it a bit grainy. I have Bob's Red Mill to try too but import fees are pretty high. I have most of the ingredients you list in the cupboard. Will let you know how I get on!!!!! Awesome!

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    1. It's worked really well for me as a general 'go to'. Have now been using it for about three years! Much less 'ricey' than commercial blends...... seems to give it a better balance. Let me know how it goes.

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Thanks for stopping by. I would love to hear from you so please feel free to leave a message about any aspect of this post. It's always great to get feedback!